k1jt's blog

Thanks to Rainer Streubel, DL3LST, a German translation of the WSPR 2.0 User's Guide is now available. A link has been placed on the WSJT/WSPR web site at

http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wspr.html

... or you may click on a direct link to the German edition,

http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/WSPR_2.0_User_German.pdf

Thanks to Krzysztof Dabrowski, OE1KDA, a Polish translation of the WSPR 2.0 User's Guide is now available. A link has been placed on the WSJT/WSPR web site:

http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wspr.html

Translations of the WSPR 2.0 User's Guide are now available in French, Brazilian Portuguese, Polish, and Russian. Translations into other languages will be welcomed; if you are interested in doing this and would like a copy of the original MS Word file in English, please let me know.

Do not be deceived by the statistics of randomly fluctuating quantities.

At signal levels close to the WSPR threshold, successive measurements of S/N will not be identical. This is a measurement issue, and is true even in the absence of actual signal fading. Upward and downward fluctuations are equally likely and will have similar magnitudes when stated as power levels. But when stated in dB, downward fluctuations will be much larger than upward ones.

Suppose the average ratio of signal to noise is 0.0015, with measurement-to-measurement fluctuations of +/-0.0010. (These are perfectly reasonable numbers for a marginal WSPR signal.) Then in dB we have

S/N (upward) = 10*log(0.0025) = -26.0 dB
S/N (average) = 10*log(0.0015) = -28.2 dB
S/N (downward) = 10*log(0.0005) = -33.0 dB

So occasionally you'll see WSPR report S/N values as low as -33 dB, because of measurement fluctuations, even if the "true" S/N was -28 dB.

Thanks to Vlad, UA6JD, a Russian translation of the WSPR 2.0 User's Guide is now available. A link has been placed on the WSJT/WSPR web site:

http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wspr.html

We now have translations of the WSPR 2.0 User's Guide in French, (Brazilian) Portuguese, and Russian. Translations into other languages would be very welcome; if you are interested in doing this and would like a copy of the original MS Word file in English, please let me know.

-- 73, Joe, K1JT

Many thanks to Rafael Haag, PY3FF, for translating the WSPR 2.0 User's Guide into Brazilian Portuguese!

The following link has been placed on the WSJT/WSPR web site:

http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/WSPR_2.0_User_Portuguese.pdf

-- 73, Joe, K1JT

Thanks to Michel, F1ERG, a French translation of the WSPR 2.0 User's Guide is now available. The following link has been placed on the WSJT/WSPR web site:

http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wspr.html

Now is a good time to mention that translations into other languages will be very welcome, and I will be happy to post them on the web site as well. If you are interested and would like a copy of the original MS Word file in English, please let me know.

-- 73, Joe, K1JT

WSPR 2.0 was downloaded 1157 times over the past 3.5 days. The most recent full day summarized in the WSPRnet database shows 567 distinct callsigns reported.

This level of interest is great, but...

Recently, especially on the 30m band, I've noticed many cases of failures to decode caused by two or more WSPR signals QRMing one another. Lest WSPR's increasing popularity contribute to its own downfall, let me suggest that users should consider moving some of their WSPRing time to less-occupied bands. Sunspots are (finally!) starting to pick up, so we should be probing potential propagation paths on some of the higher bands. Similarly, it's always fun to see what can be done at night, or perhaps along the "gray line", on the low bands.

Let's spread out more, over our available bands!

A second, unrelated item:

Interesting data from the WSPRnet "Stats" page:

The number of WSPR spots per day has roughly doubled since a week ago. The number of reporting stations and the number of unique calls reported have both increased by 60%.

I believe that yesterday (21-Nov-2009) was the first time we've seen more than 100,000 spots in a 24-hour period.

-- Joe, K1JT

Too bad that a scheduled power outage in the Princeton University Physics Department came the day after WSPR 2.0 was released. But c'mon, guys, the inconvenience lasted only a little over 12 hours.

Everything back to normal now.

-- Joe, K1JT

I am not an ARRL official, but in my opinion there is no question about it: WSPR spots, even if they occur both ways between two stations, do not constitute a QSO that is valid for DXCC or other awards.

A minimal QSO involves the exchange of information between operators, with appropriate acknowledgments. These things do not happen with automated WSPR transmissions and receptions.

A brief addendum to my email of yesterday, announcing that WSPR 2.0 is available at the WSJT web site.

WSPR 2.0 provides easy access to a new online User's Guide, http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/WSPR_2.0_User.pdf . The User's Guide will be a "living" document -- in other words, it may be updated whenever I have something useful to add.

WSPR 2.0 is now available for download from the WSJT Home Page, http://physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/
Click on WSPR in the left margin, then on the appropriate WSPR 2.0 link for your operating system. Installable binary packages are provided for Windows and for recent Debian-based 32-bit Linux systems. A recommended Linux distribution is Ubuntu 9.04.

Version 2.0 of WSPR introduces a number of new program features, including the following:

Well, in one sense the 10-meter Special Activity Day was nearly a complete bust; but in other ways I found it quite interesting.

I think we had around 20 active stations, most of the time. Not surprisingly, there was very little propagation of any sort, anywhere in the world. About 700 spots were posted, but most of them were at ground-wave distances under 150 km.

However, VK6POP copied the big 20-Watt signal of T61AA several times at 8913 km, for the DX record. Interestingly, nobody else copied T61AA at any distance.

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