The Weak Signal Propagation Reporter Network is a group of amateur radio operators using K1JT's MEPT_JT digital mode to probe radio frequency propagation conditions using very low power (QRP/QRPp) transmissions. The software is open source, and the data collected are available to the public through this site.

I WOULD APPRECIATE IF SOMEONE COULD CONTACT ME WITH STEP BY STEP INSTRUCTIONS SO THAT I WOULD BE ABLE TO USE WSPR. MY EMAIL ADDRESS IS WILLIAMMARTINOJR@COMCAST.NET.

I have been running the WSPR software since about the 20th of October 2010 and have really enjoyed it. It's amazing to see how far your signal goes when you are running very low power of 5 watts of less.

To see my WSPRnet Bio, go to http://wsprnet.org/drupal/user/10060

73,

JD
NK7W

Today I noticed some spots that didnt show up as spots, there seems to be a frequency drift of some 10hz form some folks on 10m. The signal should be perfectly redable but it slopes in the form of a J from about 155 hz to 124 hz. I'm wondering if their transmitter isn't as stable as it should be or if this is just some spurrious emission. I only seem to see it in the 10m and 6m bands. Other than that this has proved quite an interesting little program and beats the snot out of the CW beacon format. Cheers!

In the past several days I've seen quite a few WSPR signals that don't decode because they are mis-timed. This happens when one's computer clock is off by more than a few seconds, and it can be prevented by using an internet time service.

So I figured the mess out. My CLock update was not running and was pushed over 17 seconds ahead of CUT(GMT) CUT is COordinated Universal Time per NIST. HAHAH It only took me untill 2 am to figure out that I wasn't so coordinated. All fixed and appears to be working corectly using the NTP service as opposed to DIm 4. Still going to hang on to DIm 4 though It may prove more stable due to more requent updates.

A slightly amended version of WSPR 2.11, with the FMT package, has been posted on the WSJT Home Page.

Direct links are as follows:

Windows:
http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/WSPR2.11_r2250.EXE

Linux:
http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wspr_2.11r2250_i386.deb

There are two significant changes since r2247:

To all those who expressed interest in my software utilities that can help you make very accurate frequency measurements with your CAT-controlled WSPR setup:

These programs are now included in a new WSPR 2.11 package just posted on the WSJT Home Page:

http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/wspr.html

There are many reasons why from a particular location the reported
TX and RX signal-to-noise figures can be very different. One obvious
cause is a different transmit power level at the station on the other
end of a particular WSPR-path. The positioning of the RX-antenna
relative to noise sources is however often the most determining factor.
This is perfectly evident if there is only one major local noise source,
and if it is OFF intermittently (during round-the-clock WSPR-operation).

At OH3MHA and similarly on various other locations we have observed that
things are generally fairly balanced at 10 MHz and higher frequencies, but
7 MHz and 3.5 MHz very often expose computer hash, internet data transfer
spectra (e.g. HomePNA), PLC, switching power supply harmonics and the like.
I do not have experience on the lower bands (1.8 MHz / 500 kHz / 137 kHz),
but there may be a slight advantage due to the fact that there the geophysical
background noise threshold is higher to begin with (to make a fundamental
distinction as opposed to man-made noise: geophysics cannot be manipulated).

OH3MHA was temporarily active on 7 MHz where antenna SWR is optimum with
a perfect 1:1 match, but the incoming man-made noise is very high, so that often
only a few stations are received for upload, while dozens of OH3MHA-spots
are reported by others. OH3MHA transmissions are now back on 10 MHz where
the situation is fairly symmetric, with about even numbers of in/outgoing reports
for each 2-minute transmission slot... We are presently experimenting with
remoterig.com products (like the Webswitch 1216H) to have full TX-control
under all imaginable circumstances. Remote control could also be a solution
if one wants to install full WSPR-RX-functionality at a quiet remote location.

I will try to add figures and plots soon to my previous blog posting regarding the
analysis of the benefits of poor ground with vertical antennas for WSPR-traffic.

I have started to use WSPR only few days ago and I am exciting !
It was a lot of work to setup WSPR for my RX/TX Ensemble (KB9YIG SDR transceiver 1Watt output power). For receiving only I was able to use only Rocky 3.6, my external sound card Emu 0202 and internal Realtek sound card. But for transmitting I am using PowerSDR-IQ v1.12.20 by SV1EIA and EMU 0202 with VAC. I have found a lot of information about setup on http://www.df9cy.de/ar/experimental/wspr/wspr.html
After first day of transmitting I have realized, that my long wire antenna (41 m long with antenna tuner MFJ-948) works well toward Australia :)

2010-11-01 05:22 LY2BOS 10.140199 -8 0 KO24or 1 IW4EGP JN64gb 1494 223
2010-10-31 22:02 LY2BOS 10.140190 -27 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 21:44 LY2BOS 10.140190 -23 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 21:34 LY2BOS 10.140189 -26 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 20:46 LY2BOS 10.140190 -22 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 20:38 LY2BOS 10.140190 -20 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 20:28 LY2BOS 10.140190 -20 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 20:16 LY2BOS 10.140190 -19 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 20:06 LY2BOS 10.140191 -20 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 19:54 LY2BOS 10.140190 -21 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 19:42 LY2BOS 10.140190 -25 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 19:32 LY2BOS 10.140189 -25 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 19:24 LY2BOS 10.140190 -24 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109
2010-10-31 18:48 LY2BOS 10.140192 -23 0 KO24or 1 VK6ZRY OF78wd 12886 109

I've come to the conclusion I need a more stable and accurate signal generator than my circa 1950 Precision E-200-C or my Heathkit Dip Meter to align the WSPR transceiver. I ordered an N3ZI DDS 2 VFO kit.

K1JT's station is a little south of due east from my QTH (near Detroit, MI)at Az 291 that would imply Az of 0 degrees is about due south and increases in a counterclockwise compass direction. However, I noted that contacts in England or Germany as listed in the database at approximately the same Az - which I think is incorrect, please advise, thanks...

I'm new as of yesterday, 30 October. I signed up because my local club has been interested in propagation and NVIS, and we will be working on some NVIS antennas during the next year. Thank you to QST for the links; thanks to CQ Magazine for the introduction to WSPR several months ago.

Especially for new WSPR users, I call attention to the following text from step #7 of the quick-start instructions from the User's Guide:

"Select a desired Tx frequency by double-clicking somewhere in the graphical display area. Available Tx frequencies fall in the range 1400–1600 Hz above the dial frequency. Clicking near the bottom of the graphical area gives a frequency near the lower limit, and clicking near the top puts you near the upper limit."

So I have a quirky setup, sometimes it works great sometimes...well no so much. I guess I'll list out the parts of the station first. PC Alienware area 51 (Old one 3ghz Pent 4) with a Sound blaster ZS2 Card for audio interfacing. This runs with a std COM cable to a Rig Blaster Pro connected VIA CAT to an IC-7000. Heres the tricky part, the RB uses 2 sets of connections both can be configured to do different things. COM1 is for (Currently set to) RIG control, PTT and CW. COM2 is set for FSK. Windows does not like the driver for the persistant USB to RS232 adapter.

Timestamp Call MHz SNR Drift Grid Pwr Reporter RGrid km az
2010-10-30 08:04 JF3MKC 14.097085 -19 0 PM74xm 10 DE8MSH JO43kb 9020 331
2010-10-30 08:00 RA0SX 14.097089 -18 0 OO17iw 5 DE8MSH JO43kb 5449 307
2010-10-30 09:32 UA3ARC 14.097115 0 0 KO85so 5 DE8MSH JO43kb 1866 273
2010-10-30 07:50 EA2DVT 14.097097 -1 0 IN91mp 5 DE8MSH JO43kb 1467 27
2010-10-30 08:02 YO6DN 14.097034 0 0 KN26vi 5 DE8MSH JO43kb 1422 308
...

..arrived today, jumped to WSPR page and now I also am a "whisper".
Thanks to Joe and Bruce !
'73
Gabriele

Until I read the latest copy of QST, I had no idea what WSPR was. Having said that, I'm glad I took the time to download and install the software onto my computer - a home built Vista machine using an AMD processor.

Prior to using WSPR, I had the benefit of already having my K3 connected and setup for digital modes. I use DM780 quite a bit for PSK31 and whatever else strikes my fancy that day. The K3, using its built-in KIO3 board works perfectly with my computer's sound card and DM780 without any additional hardware required.

Setting up WSPR then wasn't too complicated; added my call sign, name, and CAT info and I was done. The first time WSPR set the K3 to TX however, I immediately pulled the plug. I had my K3's monitor on to hear the signal being transmitted, and what I heard sounded like an unmodulated carrier. I thought something was wrong with my connections but after reviewing again, couldn't find anything amiss.

A quick email to the Elecraft reflector relieved my concerns, as others who had previously used WSPR with their K3s told me that's what I should expect to hear. After carefully listening to the transmission again while connected to a dummy load, I could hear that the signal wasn't an unmodulated carrier; rather you could hear the tone "warbling" ever so slightly.

Now knowing that everything should be OK, I decided to try it again with my antenna back inline. After 2 minutes of receiving, the TX light came on and I could hear the signal being transmitted over the K3's monitor. After another 2 minutes, the K3 stopped transmitting and began listening again. Shortly afterwards, I checked the propagation map on this website and was excited to see my station appear. I was also shocked to see how many other stations heard my 5 watt transmission!

Good documentation and easy setup and install. Interface is not cluttered and software working without hanging or crashes. CAT control of TS-2000 working fine. Thanks to the developers of this!

Do you enjoy making very precise measurements? Have you always wanted to enter the ARRL Frequency Measurement Test (FMT), but held back because you assumed that expensive laboratory equipment must be required?

Appendix C of the WSPR 2.0 User's Guide,
http://www.physics.princeton.edu/pulsar/K1JT/WSPR_2.0_User.pdf ,
explains how to calibrate your WSPR transceiver to an accuracy better than one Hertz using over-the-air standard-frequency signals. Many WSPR users have used this procedure to establish calibration constants for their own radios, resulting in significantly improved frequency accuracies of reported WSPR spots.

About six months ago, I wrote some simple software tools that largely automate the procedure described in Appendix C and extend it to enable measuring the frequencies of unknown test signals. I used it for the ARRL FMT held last April, and my resulting measurements of all seven FMT test signals were within less than 0.3 Hz of the published "true" frequencies. (See http://www.b4h.net/fmt/fmtresults201004.php for results of the April 2010 FMT.) My equipment was very simple: nothing more than my normal WSPR setup, a Kenwood TS-2000 with the software mentioned above. Any CAT-controllable radio would do. I've even tested it with my SoftRock, with excellent results.

The next ARRL Frequency Measuring Test is less than three weeks away: November 11, 2010, starting at 0230 UTC (the evening of Nov 10 in US time zones). Details are in November QST and on the ARRL web site at
http://www.arrl.org/files/file/W1AW/Other%20FMT%20files/FMT.pdf .

If there is significant interest from others who would like to try entering the November 2010 FMT, I'd be happy to write some brief instructions on using the new frequency-measuring software tools, and make them available for free download. It will probably be simplest to just include everything in a packaged release of WSPR 2.1. If you are interested, please let me know (k1jt at arrl dot net).

"Discovered" WSPR in the Nov QST...installed the software and am amazed at the signals being heard mid-day on 30M. Great fun and looking forward to learning more!

Pages